The U.S. $10,000 bill


The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing has scans of large denomination Federal Reserve notes.

From the site:

Currency notes of denominations above $100 are not available from the Department of the Treasury, the Federal Reserve System, or the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. On July 14, 1969, the Department of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve System announced that currency notes in denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 would be discontinued immediately due to lack of use. Although they were issued until 1969, they were last printed in 1945.

These notes are legal tender and may be found in circulation today; however, most notes still in circulation are probably in the hands of private numismatic dealers and collectors. If you are interested in purchasing these larger denominations, it is suggested that you contact private dealers or collectors who are usually listed in the classified section of the telephone directory under the headings of “Coins” and “Hobbies.”

(Via Boing Boing)

Grocery Lists


Ever make a list of items to get at the store? Grocerylists.org is an online collection of people’s grocery lists.

Check out the Top 10 lists or feel free to browse any of the 1100 lists.

Some things the list collector has learned from these found lists:

More people than I thought like onions. Mayonnaise is difficult to spell. So is
banana, apparently. And anchovies. And yogurt. There are a lot of notepads out
there touting the greatness of numerous bizarrely-named pharmaceuticals. I used
to think my handwriting was lame. Now I don’t. And lastly, very few people leave
their grocery lists in the cart like they should!

(Via Boing Boing)

The U.S. $10,000 bill


The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing has scans of large denomination Federal Reserve notes.

From the site:

Currency notes of denominations above $100 are not available from the Department of the Treasury, the Federal Reserve System, or the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. On July 14, 1969, the Department of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve System announced that currency notes in denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 would be discontinued immediately due to lack of use. Although they were issued until 1969, they were last printed in 1945.

These notes are legal tender and may be found in circulation today; however, most notes still in circulation are probably in the hands of private numismatic dealers and collectors. If you are interested in purchasing these larger denominations, it is suggested that you contact private dealers or collectors who are usually listed in the classified section of the telephone directory under the headings of “Coins” and “Hobbies.”

(Via Boing Boing)

Grocery Lists


Ever make a list of items to get at the store? Grocerylists.org is an online collection of people’s grocery lists.

Check out the Top 10 lists or feel free to browse any of the 1100 lists.

Some things the list collector has learned from these found lists:

More people than I thought like onions. Mayonnaise is difficult to spell. So is
banana, apparently. And anchovies. And yogurt. There are a lot of notepads out
there touting the greatness of numerous bizarrely-named pharmaceuticals. I used
to think my handwriting was lame. Now I don’t. And lastly, very few people leave
their grocery lists in the cart like they should!

(Via Boing Boing)

Fractals


According to the wikipedia, a fractal is: A geometric object which is rough or irregular on all scales of length, and so which appears to be ‘broken up’ in a radical way. Some of the best examples can be divided into parts, each of which is similar to the original object. Fractals are said to possess infinite detail, and they may actually have a self-similar structure that occurs at different levels of magnification.

I think fractals are really cool. The infinite nature of them is amazing. Blatte’s Fractals showcases a variety of fractals. The fractal to your left is entitled, Law of Ice.

(Via Neatorama)