Amazing solar eclipse photos


solar eclipse Miloslav Druckmüller composite pictures photos amazing

solar eclipse Miloslav Druckmüller composite pictures photos amazing

solar eclipse Miloslav Druckmüller composite pictures photos amazing

solar eclipse Miloslav Druckmüller composite pictures photos amazing

Enjoy these amazing solar eclipse pictures by Czech photographer Miloslav Druckmüller from the Brno University of Technology, These amazing composite images capture the moon during a total solar eclipse revealing a vast solar corona. To achieve the crystal clear effect the shots are comprised from some 40+ photos taken with two different lenses. Additional clarity was achieved due to the incredibly remote location chosen to view the eclipse from, a pier just outside the Enewetak Radiological Observatory on the Marshall Islands, smack dab in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. You can see several more images from the project at Milosav Druckmüller’s website.

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Iridient by Fabian Oefner


Iridient - Fabian Oefner

Switzerland-based art photographer Fabian Oefner used high-speed flash photography to capture the life of soap bubbles from their creation to the exact moment of bursting in his stunning photo series titled Iridient.

Using High Speed Flash Units, his images show soap bubbles in the moment of bursting. In the first few images, you can still see the bubbles intact, a few instants after their creation. In the last pictures, you see how the thin film of soap starts to disappear, leaving behind countless tiny drops of soap water.

These images are simply stunning.

Iridient - Fabian Oefner

Iridient - Fabian Oefner

via Laughing Squid

Taking Great Fireworks Photos on Your Android or iPhone


 

Smartphone blog Gottabemobile recently detailed several great tips for taking fireworks photos. Here are a few:

  • Turn off your flash – it’s too weak to help and it will annoy the other people who only want flashes from the sky.
  • Bring a tripod – even a Gorillapod or the like is better than trying to hold the phone steady in your hand.
  • Learn your phone’s shutter lag – smartphone cameras are almost always slower than on dedicated digital cameras. Usually you’ll have a second or two of delay. Learn to work with this delay to get the best shot.
  • If your fireworks photos aren’t turning out well, just switch to video. The video quality of modern smartphones is good enough to share on YouTube or with your friends.